C1 or C5? 2003 Corvette Impersonates a 1953 Convertible

Retro conversions are some of the weirdest builds in the Corvette world. However, we get why you would want modern technology mixed with retro style, just like in the case of these two 2003 “1953 Commemorative Edition” Corvettes.

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Most people who want a ‘Vette that handles just buy the coolest old Stingray and do a restomod. However, these machines are conceived the other way around, adding vintage styling to the chassis that had just rolled off the assembly line.

They were built by Advanced Automotive Tech (AAT) of Rochester Hills, Michigan on will be on sale during the Las Vegas Mecum Auction from November 13-14. There’s no telling what they’re worth since they’re rare yet appeal to a very small crowd.

The white one is perhaps the most desirable, not just because of the color, but because it’s manual and the red leather interior with white accents is better-than-stock. Meanwhile, the cherry red example has a tan top and interior going for it.

Both are built the same way, featuring the soft curves of a 1953 C1 Corvette. The round grille with billet inserts and circular headlights trimmed in chrome are wildly different from a stock C5 Corvette. The rear end is perhaps even more flamboyant than Chevy’s first sports car.

Disguising the size of a modern American sports car is impossible. A C5 Corvette is obviously wider and lower than something from the 1950s. Everywhere you look, there’s an element blowing the illusion away, from the ground clearance to the shape of the trunk and the lack of retro wheels. Door mirrors? You want just one of those on the C1, and it certainly wouldn’t be streamlined or painted.

But AAT-modified Corvettes are so strange that some hardcore fans might decide to buy one simply for the novelty value or the attention he’ll get.

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