Lamborghini Barchetta Competizione Biposto Rendering: It’s OK to Get Excited

Not too long ago, I came across another Lamborghini rendering that made me realize one thing I never thought I would say: Lambo’s lineup is just a tad on the boring side.

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I know, it sounds ridiculous, Lamborghini is one of the biggest risk-takers when it comes to design, so how can that be? I don’t know – perhaps it’s precisely this constant search for bold, aggressive styling that ended up making all models somewhat similar. Let’s face it: you don’t choose based on looks when you pick a Lambo, but based on performance.

I know it’s stupid to call for a departure from the norm when the Italians have just added the Urus to their roster, but maybe something the other side of the size scale would have helped more. Something like the Barchetta Competizione Biposto, for example.

Anyone fluid in the very special area of the Italian language that has to do with car naming will instantly know what to expect from this model: “Barchetta” means it’s a small, roofless car, “Competizione” suggests it may have something to do with racing, and “Biposto” tells you that all your friends will suddenly be very nice to you since there’s just one more seat available.

So, we’re looking at a track-focused spyder two-seater with a V12 engine that somehow found its way inside this very compact package. It also seems to run on fuel alone as there are no obvious air vents to feed it the oxygen it normally needs. Well, this is just a design study, so let’s just enjoy it for what it is.

A lot of people will side with its author, a design graduate from Torino called Raffaele Anile, who decided to skip the usual electric powertrain format we tend to see these days and slot a virtual V12 engine in his machine. As we said, that looks to be easier said than done, but it’s the intention that counts.

Raffaele says he was influenced in his creative process by two of the most iconic Lamborghini models ever: the Miura and the Countach. It’s pretty difficult to spot their influences in Raffaele’s final proposal for the Barchetta Competizione Biposto (BCB) if I’m being honest, yet that shouldn’t keep your imagination from enjoying this model.

Anyone who enjoys driving would welcome a car like this. Even the most hardcore Ferrari fans would admit how great the BCB is, even if only to themselves and after they’ve had too much to drink. And what’s not to like in a machine that’s been designed for driving with little to no compromise? Is the Lamborghini lineup boring? Maybe, maybe not. Next to this, though, it’s a complete snoozefest.

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